Life Sciences 2019: Post-translational modification and cell signalling


Submit your abstract by 21 January 2019 for this exciting meeting on 17-18 March 2019 in Nottingham, UK. 

By Gary Stephens, member of the Organising Committee

Even after proteins are built via transcription and translation, post-translational modifications (PTMs) can change their function. As this has implications throughout the body – such as neuronal signalling, cardiac function, circadian rhythms and in diseases including cancer and psychiatric disorders – post translational modulations are an expanding area of scientific research. All physiologists looking to innovate their science by networking across disciplines should attend Life Science 2019, brought to you by The Physiological Society, the British Pharmacological Society and the Biochemical Society.

In addition to symposia and plenary lectures, the meeting will have training events and an early career researcher (ECR) networking event. If you’re keen to present your research orally, you’re in luck, as a good number of submitted abstracts will be elevated to oral presentations, in particular from ECRs.

PTMs increase the diversity of the protein function, primarily by adding functional groups to proteins, but can also involve the modification of regulatory subunits, or degradation of proteins to terminate effects. PTMs include numerous biologically vital processes such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, nitrosylation, methylation, acetylation, lipidation and proteolysis. Identifying and understanding PTMs within major body systems including neuronal, cardiovascular and immune systems is critical in the study of normal physiological function and disease treatment.

As a researcher interested in synaptic function, one symposium that has immediate personal appeal is “PTMs in the regulation of neuronal synapses” will include how PTMs on both sides of the synapse are fundamental to forms of synaptic plasticity. Matt Gold (University College London, UK) will speak on targeting of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in postsynaptic spines. Moitrayee Bhattacharyya (University of California, Berkeley, USA) will present about the postsynapse, specifically the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in driving synaptic long-term potentiation via modifications in postsynaptic spines. For the ion channel aficionados, Annette Dolphin (University College London, UK) will discuss the role of post-translational proteolytic cleavage of α2δ voltage-gated calcium channel subunits in synaptic function.

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Protein methylation in health and disease will feature a presentation from Steven Clarke, (University of California Los Angeles, USA) on cross-talk between methyltransferases to affect the final degree of protein modification and epigenetic control. Kusum Kharbanda (University of Nebraska, USA) will present about how external stimuli such as the consumption of alcohol has important cellular consequences for methyltransferase activity and the development of disease. Pedro Beltran-Alvarez (University of Hull) will detail the combination of biochemical, cell biology, bioinformatics and proteomics methods used to identify the arginine methylome in tissues including platelets and the heart. This has clear functional importance in physiological cardiovascular function.

We hope to see you in Nottingham!

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