Practical Innovations in Life Science Education


By Nick Freestone, Kingston University

On 27- 28 April, The Physiological Society held a workshop under the auspices of the Education and Teaching Theme. The workshop was held at The Society’s HQ, Hodgkin Huxley House, and in somewhat of a departure for such an event, extended an invite to those unsung heroes of the Higher Education environment – technical support staff.  Thus, in the weeks leading up to the event, to encourage participation from this under-represented group (in The Physiological Society participation terms anyway) various inducements were proffered to our technical colleagues. Primary amongst these was the offer of an all-expenses paid trip to London contingent upon the submission of an abstract as a prelude to a poster presentation at the event itself. Who could refuse such a generous offer?

Equally heartening from the point of view of your cynical correspondent was the presence of a number of new faces to the physiological pedagogical arena. This served to greatly enliven the proceedings and ensured that the event wasn’t merely an echo chamber reverberating to the well-worn axioms of the usual suspects.

Happily the event kicked off with lunch, which served as a great prompt for punctuality. This was followed by Session 1 chaired with great aplomb by Sarah Hall (Cardiff University) where the audience was blown away by fantastic contributions from Iain Rowe (Robert Gordon University) on teaching pharmacokinetics, Viv Rolfe (University of the West of England) on Open Educational Resources, Michelle Sweeney (Newcastle University) on the use of LabTutor and our very own Derek Scott (Aberdeen) on developing a renal physiology practical for large groups – no urine required!.

This left the audience so energised that a refreshment break was necessary to recover. After this much-needed pause, Session 2 included contributions from Frances Macmillan (University of Bristol), on developing experimental design skills in first and second year students and Rachel Ashworth (Queen Mary University of London) on using technology to teach respiratory physiology from a clinical perspective.

Given so much food for thought it was an opportune time for the participants to form smaller discussion groups facilitated by the Education and Teaching Theme Leads and tireless organisers to discuss a variety of questions posed by The Physiological Society around the general question of “how can The Society help?”. Having set the world to rights in this format, and having provided The Physiological Society with an extensive to-do list, heroically noted down in real time by Chrissy Stokes, the formal part of the day was rounded off by a message from our sponsors, ADInstruments, who reported on upcoming initiatives involving their widely used educational wares. Rather more informal was a wine and poster session which melded seamlessly into a later gathering at a local hostelry.

Day 2 kicked off with a plenary lecture by Peter Alston of Liverpool University. While Peter is not a physiologist, his talk, “Technology-informed curriculum design” was received with rapt attention by an appreciative audience. At this stage of the proceedings, Professor Judy Harris (Bristol University) exerted her considerable crowd control skills and marshalled the next batch of contributions expertly and smoothly. These included talks from Dave Lewis (University of Leeds) on Open Educational Resources, Hannah Moir (Kingston University) who did a livestream of her lecture to us to her own students via an app called Periscope (Think about that for a while! Hannah lectured to us, whilst showing students that she was lecturing to us whilst giving us a demonstration of a technique to enhance student engagement. There’s too many layers there for me to unpack into a coherent story!), Louise Robinson (Derby University) and our very own Sheila Amici-Dargan on how online tools can be used to enhance the learning and teaching environment. Louise Robinson’s talk deserves a special mention here covering as it did a topic close to my own heart, lecturing using gamification techniques. This caused an appreciative hubbub from the assembled throng.

Now if you thought gamification was a bit outré in the august setting of The Physiological Society HQ then you would have been astonished by the contribution of Emma Hodson-Tole (Manchester Metropolitan University) who gave a talk on teaching physiology through the medium of interpretative dance!

I told you this was a different kind of conference. This presentation, in the batch of talks after refreshments, focussed on motor neurone disease and provided evidence on how learning can be facilitated across different groups using unconventional teaching techniques. Other talks in this section included my own (Kingston University) on Outreach and Public Engagement by the use of a “Lab in a Lorry”-initiative funded by HEFCE, and Dawn Davies (Bristol University) who talked about her work using patient simulators in public arenas such as shopping centres. This looked fantastic, if rather daunting fun!

Now I started off talking about how this wasn’t your usual run-of-the-mill academic event, with the old hands nodding sagely while trying not to fall asleep after lunch. No! This event included actual live students! These were Patrick Evans and Elodie Cox also of Bristol University (Judy’s enthusiasm for learning and teaching is obviously infectious). Their talk “Engaging the public with final year undergraduate projects” definitely proved one thing once and for all. Our students are a FANTASTIC resource, capable of giving much better talks than even the most seasoned academic. Suitably humbled and chastened by this demonstration of youthful excellence, the excited crowd networked over lunch whilst perusing some of the items of equipment one can put on the road in a “Lab in a Lorry”.

Feedback from the event was uniformly and overwhelmingly positive. Ideas are being gestated as we speak as a result of this inspirational event. Watch this space for more positive, energising educational stuff in the near future.

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